Posted on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 by lgillespie
It is with deep sadness that we inform you that Lloyd Cotsen, collector and philanthropist, passed away peacefully at home on May 8, 2017.  He lived an extraordinary life for 88 years, with a loving spirit and a generous heart.  We will all miss his judgment and his artistic sensitivity as his vital work continues.   Mr. Cotsen began collecting in the early 1960s, and had a particular interest in fiber art. In 2008, he donated a large collection of baskets by contemporary artists to RAM. This 151 piece collection augmented the...
 
Posted on Tuesday, April 11, 2017 by lgillespie
RAM has learned, with sadness, of the death on April 7 of John Glick, one of the nation’s most respected studio potters. Glick operated Plum Tree Pottery in Farmington Hills, Michigan, in suburban Detroit from 1964 through 2016. He had recently closed the pottery to retire to California with his wife, looking forward to the next stage in his life. Glick was a Detroit native who was born in 1938 and received his MFA from the Cranbrook Academy of Art in 1962. His work is infused with a quite sense of experimentation in patterning and glaze...
 
Posted on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 by lgillespie
Racine Art Museum will receive a grant from Racine Community Foundation to support the expansion of the RAM on the Road program to include all Racine Unified School District second-grade students. RAM's Wustum Museum is nationally known for its outreach programs that encourage at-risk children to stay in school and help establish an environment of lifelong interest in the arts. RAM on the Road drives the museum's quality educational art programs to the community delivering art teachers, materials and supplies to schools, day cares,...
 
Posted on Tuesday, January 24, 2017 by lgillespie
The internationally known art jeweler, Nel Linssen, died on August 1, 2016 in the Netherlands where she lived her entire life. She was born in 1935 and began her art career as a figurative textile artist in the 1970s. Exposure to quilts led to Linssen’s experimentation with paper and its flexibility. Her first exhibition of paper bracelets took place in 1986 and she has since become well-known for using this everyday material to make subtly colored, rhythmically structured neckpieces and bracelets. Her work is particularly noted for the...
 
Posted on Wednesday, January 18, 2017 by lgillespie
Randall Darwall, one of the finest hand weavers in the US, died Friday, January 13, 2017. Born in 1948, he studied painting but became attracted to the structure of the weaving process early in his career. Over the following decades, he created hand-woven cloth that is surprising in its complex color palette shifts and patterns. Working in silk to develop glowing color surfaces, he has become internationally known for the scarves and shawls made from his lush painterly fabrics. For over 25 years Darwall had also been working collaboratively...
 
Posted on Wednesday, January 18, 2017 by
The internationally recognized ceramic sculptor, Akio Takamori, died last Wednesday, January 11, 2017. He was born in 1950 in Japan where he received his initial introduction to ceramics. He moved to the US to study further at the Kansas City Art Institute (BFA) and Alfred University in New York (MFA). His first national attention came in the 1980s for large-scale dimensional vessels that depicted nude figures. He then started a long-term series of freestanding figures of Japanese villagers that were frequently displayed in groupings. Takamori...
 
Posted on Tuesday, March 12, 2013 by dzaleski
I will be focusing only on object labels in this blog, but as a general and quite obvious statement, all must agree that museums are loaded down with labels. Exhibition labels, object labels, labels that give directions to cafés, restrooms, libraries, etc. Altogether the experience can lead to a sensory overload, the truth is labels are the glue that hold exhibitions together. And a lot goes in to them. One would think that working for a museum that deals with the contemporary art field, it wouldn’t be difficult to track down...