RAM Artist Fellowship Inaugural Exhibition

August 30 – November 30, 2013

Presented by the Osborne and Scekic Family Foundation

This exhibition is a series of solo shows featuring the work of four area artists who were recipients of the inaugural RAM Artist Fellowships. Meant to showcase the diversity and vitality of the Racine/Kenosha visual arts community, the biennial fellowships provide support for the professional development of the community’s artists. Representing a diverse range of styles and media, this exhibition features the work of:

JERROLD BELLAND
DOUG DEVINNY
KIMBERLY GREENE
KATHLEEN LAYBOURN

RAM Artist Fellowship Inaugural Exhibition

August 30 – November 30, 2013

Presented by the Osborne and Scekic Family Foundation

This exhibition is a series of solo shows featuring the work of four area artists who were recipients of the inaugural RAM Artist Fellowships. Meant to showcase the diversity and vitality of the Racine/Kenosha visual arts community, the biennial fellowships provide support for the professional development of the community’s artists. Representing a diverse range of styles and media, this exhibition features the work of:

JERROLD BELLAND
DOUG DEVINNY
KIMBERLY GREENE
KATHLEEN LAYBOURN
Jerrold Belland
Untitled Cartoon 6 , 2012
Inkjet print on wood
6 x 10 inches
Courtesy of the Artist
Photography: Jerrold Belland

Jerrold Belland

Artist Statement

After years of art school training, exhibiting, and turning every corner I could to discover a new slant on my creative endeavors, I have come back to the place that I started. I make paintings that tell a story. In the postmodern art lexicon this could be viewed as retrograde stuff. However, there you have it. I feel that I’m part of a tradition of storytellers that ranges from Giotto to Max Beckmann. I have a special fondness for the era of Germany between the wars.

The work tends toward the sad, perhaps, or sometimes the mystical: a young girl examines her flaws in a mirror; devils bound about in a room during a family fracas; God swirls helplessly in the air as a young Lethario phones an interested female. The young and the beautiful act out the time-old patterns of narcissism, hubris, and self destruction while the old person’s wisdom goes unheeded.

I have been told that there is a comic element in my work. If there is, then fine. Maybe it is my inner mind throwing water on the super-heated subject matter I often use. Beyond the absurdity, the Joker is at work.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE ARTIST

Jerrold Belland

Jerrold Belland
Untitled Cartoon 6 , 2012
Inkjet print on wood
6 x 10 inches
Courtesy of the Artist
Photography: Jerrold Belland

Artist Statement

After years of art school training, exhibiting, and turning every corner I could to discover a new slant on my creative endeavors, I have come back to the place that I started. I make paintings that tell a story. In the postmodern art lexicon this could be viewed as retrograde stuff. However, there you have it. I feel that I’m part of a tradition of storytellers that ranges from Giotto to Max Beckmann. I have a special fondness for the era of Germany between the wars.

The work tends toward the sad, perhaps, or sometimes the mystical: a young girl examines her flaws in a mirror; devils bound about in a room during a family fracas; God swirls helplessly in the air as a young Lethario phones an interested female. The young and the beautiful act out the time-old patterns of narcissism, hubris, and self destruction while the old person’s wisdom goes unheeded.

I have been told that there is a comic element in my work. If there is, then fine. Maybe it is my inner mind throwing water on the super-heated subject matter I often use. Beyond the absurdity, the Joker is at work.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE ARTIST
Doug DeVinny
City Serendipity II, 2013
Mixed media
26 x 20 inches
Courtesy of the Artist
Photography: Doug DeVinny

Doug DeVinny

Artist Statement

When I began working on pieces for the fellowship, my intention was to create a body of urban images that evolved from the casual observation of familiar architectural nuances. Ideally, these images—which I would fragment and stylize—would create a visual context that would be simultaneously familiar and foreign. Technically, my goal was to create pictures in both digital and traditional mediums, hoping to allow them to complement each other. The resultant work satisfies many of my objectives and is visually very much about Racine—and a bit of Milwaukee—from a perspective not singly perceived.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE ARTIST

Doug DeVinny

Doug DeVinny
City Serendipity II, 2013
Mixed media
26 x 20 inches
Courtesy of the Artist
Photography: Doug DeVinny

Artist Statement

When I began working on pieces for the fellowship, my intention was to create a body of urban images that evolved from the casual observation of familiar architectural nuances. Ideally, these images—which I would fragment and stylize—would create a visual context that would be simultaneously familiar and foreign. Technically, my goal was to create pictures in both digital and traditional mediums, hoping to allow them to complement each other. The resultant work satisfies many of my objectives and is visually very much about Racine—and a bit of Milwaukee—from a perspective not singly perceived.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE ARTIST
Kimberly Greene
Model for a New Landscape: Equilateral Brick Series 1 (detail), 2013
Glazed porcelain
Various dimensions
Courtesy of the Artist
Photography: Rik Sferra

Kimberly Greene

Artist Statement

My work is a model for a building project. It is a re-visioning of space and architecture. In this work, I create the beginnings of a new landscape. The bricks, based on an equilateral triangle, evoke a built environment of faceted spherical spaces rather than ordinary rectangular cubes. The imagined landscape is disorienting, the spherical spaces conflict with the rectangular spaces of daily life. Spaces are re-built and re-humanized. These are difficult spaces, not flat, convenient or practical. As the viewer experiences the space, the industrial history of brick making is reflected in the multitude of building blocks, each a result of laborious, obsessive, repetitive making. Questions of handmade verses industrial reproduction are brought into the fore. The nature of the loose, interchangeable and interlocking elements invites the viewer to mentally rearrange and rebuild the space creating an ever changing and evolving landscape.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE ARTIST

Kimberly Greene

Kimberly Greene
Model for a New Landscape: Equilateral Brick Series 1 (detail), 2013
Glazed porcelain
Various dimensions
Courtesy of the Artist
Photography: Rik Sferra

Artist Statement

My work is a model for a building project. It is a re-visioning of space and architecture. In this work, I create the beginnings of a new landscape. The bricks, based on an equilateral triangle, evoke a built environment of faceted spherical spaces rather than ordinary rectangular cubes. The imagined landscape is disorienting, the spherical spaces conflict with the rectangular spaces of daily life. Spaces are re-built and re-humanized. These are difficult spaces, not flat, convenient or practical. As the viewer experiences the space, the industrial history of brick making is reflected in the multitude of building blocks, each a result of laborious, obsessive, repetitive making. Questions of handmade verses industrial reproduction are brought into the fore. The nature of the loose, interchangeable and interlocking elements invites the viewer to mentally rearrange and rebuild the space creating an ever changing and evolving landscape.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE ARTIST
Kathleen Laybourn
A Murder of Crows, 20112–13
Mason line, metal, modeling clay, and acrylic
Courtesy of the Artist
Photography: Kathleen Laybourn

Kathleen Laybourn

Artist Statement

More Than an Icon
Culture creates its definition of who is to be considered “iconic” by assigning value that is based on physical attributes, talent, social status, or desirability. As definitive representations of the time in which they lived, iconic persons become larger than life and oftentimes lose their humanness in the process. Their emblematic status prompts us to forget their victories, struggles, and pain.

Various subcultures have a way of manipulating the meaning of these lives to advance a particular point of view. For example, religious traditions will focus on attributes that vastly vary from the media, whose pursuit of “news” may willfully misrepresent an individual in order to influence the public’s perception. And, trends are created by “experts” to guide behavior and influence almost every aspect of our lives.

This body of work is an invitation for the viewer to ponder more than the immediate and fixed conceptions about the four
women represented in this exhibition. It is an effort to reconnect with the vulnerable and fragile nature of flesh and blood in light of the brave, tragic, or triumphant lives lived.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE ARTIST

Kathleen Laybourn

Kathleen Laybourn
A Murder of Crows, 20112–13
Mason line, metal, modeling clay, and acrylic
Courtesy of the Artist
Photography: Kathleen Laybourn

Artist Statement

More Than an Icon
Culture creates its definition of who is to be considered “iconic” by assigning value that is based on physical attributes, talent, social status, or desirability. As definitive representations of the time in which they lived, iconic persons become larger than life and oftentimes lose their humanness in the process. Their emblematic status prompts us to forget their victories, struggles, and pain.

Various subcultures have a way of manipulating the meaning of these lives to advance a particular point of view. For example, religious traditions will focus on attributes that vastly vary from the media, whose pursuit of “news” may willfully misrepresent an individual in order to influence the public’s perception. And, trends are created by “experts” to guide behavior and influence almost every aspect of our lives.

This body of work is an invitation for the viewer to ponder more than the immediate and fixed conceptions about the four
women represented in this exhibition. It is an effort to reconnect with the vulnerable and fragile nature of flesh and blood in light of the brave, tragic, or triumphant lives lived.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE ARTIST

Gallery of Work

Exhibitions at RAM are made possible by:

Platinum Sponsors

Judith and David Flegel Fund
Ron and Judith Isaacs
Nicholas and Nancy Kurten
Windgate Foundation

Diamond Sponsors

Osborne and Scekic Family Foundation
Ruffo Family Foundation

Gold Sponsors
Anonymous
David Charak
Silver Sponsors
A.C. Buhler Family
Andis Foundation
Lucy G. Feller
Ben and Dawn Flegel
Annette Hirsch Family
Dorothy MacVicar
RDK Foundation, Inc.

Jan Serr and John Shannon
Twin Disc, Inc.
Bronze Sponsors

Anonymous
Baird
Susan Boland
Virginia Buhler
Educators Credit Union
Fredrick and Deborah Ganaway
Get Behind the Arts Studio Tour
William A. Guenther
Tom and Sharon Harty
Andrea and Tony Hauser
David and Judy Hecker
Bradley Lynch
Carlotta Miller
Larry and Barbara Newman
The Norbell Foundation
Deb and Willard Walker

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